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Literary Science Sparks: Grade 11 (Chemistry)

Image representing Literary Science Sparks at the Jacksonville Public Library

 

Standards

LAFS.1112.RST.1.2: Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.

SC.912.P.8.4: Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by describing the structure of atoms in terms of protons, neutrons and electrons, and differentiate among these particles in terms of their mass, electrical charges and locations within the atom.

SC.912.P.8.5: Relate properties of atoms and their position in the periodic table to the arrangement of their electrons.

 

Literary Sparks

  1. If you joined the spy world, what would be your secret weapon? Body armor and weapons like Kevin, biological agents and chemicals like Alex, the art of disguise like Val, or would you bring something else to the table?
  2. Which agents or chemicals are most likely to be used to create a deliberate outbreak? How would governments find out that a deliberate outbreak had taken place?
  3. What treatment is available? Would mass vaccination be an option in the case of a disease outbreak? Should people be vaccinated now as a prevention, and if so against what?

Exploration

Periodic Table Battleship!

Learning Outcomes Statement:

The Periodic Table Battleship program will help participants gain an understanding of the elements of the periodic table and how they are connected which will develop the core academic skill of creativity and innovation by connecting ideas in new ways

Materials Needed:

 

LAFS.1112.RST.1.2: Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; summarize complex concepts, processes, or information presented in a text by paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate terms.

SC.912.P.8.4: Explore the scientific theory of atoms (also known as atomic theory) by describing the structure of atoms in terms of protons, neutrons and electrons, and differentiate among these particles in terms of their mass, electrical charges and locations within the atom.

SC.912.P.8.5: Relate properties of atoms and their position in the periodic table to the arrangement of their electrons

Program Type:

  • Advisory Board / Leadership
  • Life Skills
  • Research and Databases
  • Technology
  • General / Other

Library Resources/Materials to Share:

530 GRAY  Reactions : an illustrated exploration of elements, molecules, and change in the universe by Theodore Gray

530 MORGAN From Greek atoms to quarks : discovering atoms by Sally Morgan

539.7 OXLADE 2007 Atoms by Chris Oxlade.

540 MOONEY Chemistry: investigate the matter that makes up your world byCarla Mooney

546 KEAN  The disappearing spoon : and other true tales of rivalry, adventure, and the history of the world from the periodic table of the elements by Sam Kean.

Notes for Introduction:

Welcome to Periodic Table Battleship.  Hello, my name is ___________. Today we are going to be exploring the periodic table and then we will play Periodic Table Battleship!  First, let’s take a look at what we will find on the periodic table of elements.

Elements are substances that cannot be broken down into simpler forms of matter, and they are the primary constituents of all matter. The elements are the basis of all chemical interactions, and the implications of the ways in which atoms interact are relevant to every aspect of our lives, from health to technology, energy, and the environment.

All matter is made of atoms.

Atoms consist of protons, neutrons, and electrons; the nucleus consists of protons and neutrons, with electrons orbiting in shells.  Protons have a positive charge, electrons have a negative charge, and neutrons have no charge. Changing the numbers of protons, electrons, or neutrons changes an atom and can create different elements and isotopes; isotopes are atoms of a single element that differ in number of neutrons, and can be stable or unstable.

Activities Description:

Preparation:

Laminate copies of periodic tables. Glue or paper clip two copies of the table on the inside of file folders.

Game Play:   Each student needs to make his or her ‘ships’ with dry erase marker on the periodic table that is laying flat on the file folder. You decide how many and what kind of ships are in play. The shape can vary as well (some horizontal and some vertical).  

Each player will create ships with dry erase marker:

  1.   Aircraft carrier (5 blocks)
  2.   Battleship (4 blocks)
  3.   Submarine (3 blocks)
  4.   Cruiser (3 blocks)
  5.   Destroyer (2 blocks)

Player 1 will call out a period and group number and player 2 will identify which element that represents. Player 2 will then indicate if that is a ‘miss’ or a ‘hit.’

The top periodic table on the file folder is used to show what are hits or misses for the opponent.

Repeat with player 2.

The player who sinks all of his or her opponent’s ships first is the winner.

Questions for Feedback and Reflection:

  • What is an element?
  • What is an atom?
  • What happens to an atom when its structure is changed?
  • How do knowledge and understanding of elements impact different aspects of our lives?

 

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