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Plate V.

Plate V. The French Reach Port Royal

Plate V. The French Reach Port Royal

Resuming their voyage as before, they discovered a river which they called Bellevue [Conspectu bellum, “beautiful view”]; and, after sailing three or four miles farther, they were informed that not far off was another river, surpassing all the rest in size and beauty. When they reached this, they found it so magnificent and great a stream that they named it Port Royal. Here they took in sail, and came to anchor in ten fathoms. The commander, on landing with some soldiers, found the country very beautiful, as it was well wooded with oak, cedar, and other trees. As they went on through the woods, they saw Indian peacocks, or turkeys, flying past, and deer going by. The mouth of this river is three French leagues, or miles, wide, and is divided onto two arms, one turning to the west, the other to the north. This latter is thought by some to connect with the Jordan; the other returns to the sea, as residents there have ascertained. These two branches are two full miles wide, and midway between them is an island whose point looks toward the mouth of the river. Shortly after, embarking again, they entered the arm making to the northward, in order to examine its advantages; and, after proceeding about twelve miles, they saw a company of Indians, who, on perceiving the boats, immediately took flight, leaving a lynx’s whelp which they were roasting; from which circumstances the place was called Lynx Point. On going still farther, they came to another branch of the river coming in from the east, up which the commander determined to go, leaving the main channel.

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